Inter-piece Sampling and Convolution : Portfolio of 5.1 Acousmatic and Electronica Compositions, Interactive Diagrams and Text.

Reeder, Philip (2012) Inter-piece Sampling and Convolution : Portfolio of 5.1 Acousmatic and Electronica Compositions, Interactive Diagrams and Text. Doctoral thesis, University of the Arts London, Falmouth University.

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Abstract / Summary

This practice-based PhD –‘Inter-piece Sampling and Convolution’–evolved against the background of composers such as Amon Tobin and Monty Adkins, who use techniques and workflows common to both acousmatic and electronica music. The pieces in this thesis are linked through a sustained commitment to working across these two musical contexts and through their relationships to source materials and pulses. Sound materials have been sampled from within the pieces themselves, and materials from older pieces have been convolved with newer sounds, furthering the connections between pieces. The continual feeding-forward of source material promoted the synchronous development of the conceptual tool: Input, Sculpt, Output, which brought about the evolution of intricate diagrams. All of the pieces are for fixed media, and nine of the ten are in 5.1-format surround sound.

The complex web of interrelationships created by the process of sampling and convolving material from previous pieces demanded an innovative means of representation. This representation took on a diagrammatic form in order to facilitate the analysis of a sound’s continuous (re)appropriation, explicated within supporting text. The diagrams indicate the extensive use of sampling and convolution to connect pieces, and include embedded hyperlinks to audio at various stages. As a result, textual analysis of techniques and their implications takes place across multiple pieces, and results in a wider scope for individual commentaries. The hyperlinked nature of the diagrams provides a foundation for further research, and a number of conclusions are posited about the use of sampling and convolution across multiple pieces.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Computer music. Electronic music. Electronica (Music).
Subjects: Music
Depositing User: Lucy
Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2019 14:41
Last Modified: 21 Mar 2019 14:41
URI: http://repository.falmouth.ac.uk/id/eprint/3231

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