Moth Project: Four Deadlines & a Dinner/TALKCPR Bevan Commission Annual Conference 2017/18

Salkeld, Nicola and Rudolph, Ashley (2017) Moth Project: Four Deadlines & a Dinner/TALKCPR Bevan Commission Annual Conference 2017/18. In: Moth Project: Four Deadlines & a Dinner/TALKCPR Bevan Commission Annual Conference 2017/18, 14 09 17, Swansea.

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Abstract / Summary

Four Deadlines & a Dinner was a MOTH collaborative practice project working with 20 Stage 2 Graphic
Design students at Falmouth University along with external partners from medicine, palliative care,
writing, design for the live environment and VR. During this four week period, students worked across a
range of death & design projects, they discussed and delivered ideas and potential solutions relating to
end of life experiences.
With Dr Mark Taubert Clinical Director/Consultant in Palliative Medicine at Velindre NHS Trust, Cardiff,
we explored how visual communication designers and medics could benefit from sharing knowledge and
skills to impact on policy and practice with regard to end of life matters, in particular with patients with
life limiting illness and their choices regarding DNACPR. The work produced from this will exhibited at
the Bevan Commission Health and Social Welfare Conference in Wales in September 2017.
In collaboration with Ben James, Creative Director at Jotta Design and Anna Kiernan a Senior Lecturer
in Writing, we considered our own personal eulogies and innovative ways in which to store our digital
selves as either a digital legacy or digital archive beyond our physical life.
MOTH hosted a Death Over Dinner party, where our guests were invited to eat and engage in meaningful
conversations and questions about the end-of-life, we also held a film night where we screened AfterLife,
by Hirokazu Kore-eda: Newly deceased find themselves in a way station somewhere between Heaven and
Earth. With the help of caseworkers, each soul is given three days to choose one memory from their life that they
will relive for eternity. The project also included a tour of artist’s graves at Falmouth Cemetery run by Glyn
Winchester from Falmouth Art Gallery.

+ Bevan Commission Annual Conference 2017.Swansea Wales.
The Bevan Commission is an independent and authoritative think tank made up of international experts who help challenge current NHS thinking and practice to ensure it is fit for the future. It provides its advice to Welsh Government on all matters relating to health, the NHS and social care in Wales.Chaired by Professor Sir Mansel Aylward CB.
With Dr Mark Taubert MOTH explored how visual communication designers and medics could benefit from sharing knowledge and skills to impact on policy and practice with regard to end of life matters, in particular with patients with
life limiting illness and their choices regarding DNACPR.

+ NHS talkcpr.wales The MOTH Talk CPR Art in Medicine Project. Talk CPR – Discuss DNACPR Talk CPR’s goal is to encourage conversation about CardioPulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for people affected by life-limiting and palliative illnesses. Talking about Do Not Attempt CardioPulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) is an important part of advance care planning and can help minimise distress at a later stage.

+ NICE National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Shared Learning database. The MOTH TalkCPR Art in Medicine Project. The MOTH TalkCPR Art in Medicine Project., January 2018. This submission sets out the journey we took to consider whether graphic design in medical palliative care settings could be a powerful and effective way of addressing practical, psychological, social and spiritual issues that face people at the end of their lives. The 'Talk CPR' project in Wales has multiple facets, including work in 2017 with graphic design lecturers and students from Falmouth University, who have their own End-of-life project called MOTH. This is an 'ethnographical' approach to research, more details of which can be found here.
The project lead met art school lecturers and students to describe the issue of resuscitation in palliative settings and tasked them with creating visual and graphic stimuli to encourage frank discussion about future wishes surrounding death, dying and matters such as wishes around cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
This resulted in the students creating thought-provoking artwork that looked at dying from a very different angle, compared to the more typical mainstream healthcare approaches of blue background patient information leaflets. Students produced videos, images and photographs.
Aims and objectives

Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) discussions and forms are nearly always initiated by doctors, and they can be a source of distress, harm and complaints from patients and their loved-ones.
In 2015, a national campaign in Wales called 'Sharing and Involving- TalkCPR', sought to put patients at the centre of discussions. As part of this endeavour, the TalkCPR project group led by Dr Mark Taubert, met with the Falmouth University Moth group, to discuss graphic design initiatives for patients to trigger patient led discussions on DNACPR.
The brief was for the artwork to bring about reflection and encourage individuals to ask the question: "Would I actually want CPR in the last years of my life?" Furthermore, in line with NICE Guidelines for End of Life Care in adults (QS13), NG31 and NG61 for end of life care for children, infants and young people with life limiting conditions, it sought to encourage patients and healthcare professionals to approach the advance care planning topic without too much trepidation, and without fear of upsetting the person they were talking to.
Key learning points

Further exhibitions in hospitals are planned for 2018 and 2019. The designs and posters have been used in medical students and junior doctor teaching sessions in Velindre Cancer Centre and in Llandough hospital. One of the Moth/TalkCPR videos has been disseminated via Youtube link on Twitter and has received very positive feedback. Graphic design is everywhere around us, casting its influence and shaping our thoughts and views. But those working in healthcare or experiencing illness often do not have the opportunity to change or influence this art. The Moth/TalkCPR project sought to change this shortfall, whilst also acknowledging that it is difficult to ‘measure the impact of art’, given how each of us perceives and processes such things very differently.
The relationship between medicine, death and graphic design helped shape this project and we wanted to explore how art and graphic design can be used to promote and forward NICE guidance on end-of-life care, including the often used advice that we need to talk more about our dying moments.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)
Subjects: Communication > Graphic Design
Courses by Department: The School of Communication Design > Graphic Design
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Nicola Salkeld
Date Deposited: 03 Oct 2018 10:27
Last Modified: 08 Oct 2019 13:19
URI: http://repository.falmouth.ac.uk/id/eprint/2717

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