Projective Identity and Procedural Rhetoric in Educational Multimedia: Towards the Enrichment of Programming Self-Concept and Growth Mindset with Fantasy Role-Play

Scott, Michael (2013) Projective Identity and Procedural Rhetoric in Educational Multimedia: Towards the Enrichment of Programming Self-Concept and Growth Mindset with Fantasy Role-Play. In: Proceedings of the 21st ACM International Conference on Multimedia, October 21-25, 2013, Barcelona, Spain.

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Official URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2502209

Abstract / Summary

There is a growing movement in the behavioral sciences towards exploring more situated, pragmatic and ontological accounts of human learning. Positive psychology shows that a reciprocal relationship may exist between self-concept and the development of expertise, while social psychology reveals that implicit theories about the nature of intelligence can have profound impacts on practice behavior. Thus, nurturing psychological constructs through learning environments may empower students, enabling them to learn more effectively. Educational multimedia is known to support learning in a range of contexts, but its role in facilitating such self-enrichment has seldom been explored. However, it is not clear which designs can aid both self enhancement and skill development. This paper proposes that the interplay of projective identity and procedural rhetoric, delivered as a fantasy role-playing experience, could be one such practice. Early experiments in the area of computer programming show promise, but raise questions about external validity, relevant effect sizes and how multimedia can facilitate embodiment.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Subjects: Computer Science, Information & General Works
Technology > Digital Works > Digital Games
Education
Courses by Department: The School of Film & Television > Games and Animation
Depositing User: Michael Scott
Date Deposited: 06 Oct 2015 15:06
Last Modified: 06 Oct 2015 15:06
URI: http://repository.falmouth.ac.uk/id/eprint/1648

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